Welcome to the 2014 Annual Meeting Website

 ON-LINE REGISTRATION FOR THE 2014 CONFERENCE AT SUNY POTSDAM WILL CLOSE AT 11:59 AM ON THURSDAY APRIL 10TH.

DAY RATES AND REGISTRATION WILL BE AVAILABLE ON SITE.

 

The 2014 Annual Meetings will be hosted by SUNY Potsdam, SUNY Plattsburgh, and St Lawrence University. The meetings will be held on the campus of SUNY Potsdam on Friday April 11 and Saturday April 12. Registration and Paper/Panel submission will open on January 6, 2014. Paper/Panel submission will close on March 31, 2014. If you have problems with registration or submission, please contact Alan Hersker, herskeal@potsdam.edu. 

"Weathering Storms & Shifting Landscapes"

This year’s conference theme can be addressed metaphorically or literally, historically or contemporaneously.   Anthropologically, we can consider the multitude of ways in which humans weather political, economic, cultural, ethical and environmental "storms" and their resultant “shifts” in landscapes.  Landscapes shift in response to climatic events, changing demographics, human migrations, plagues, disease, economic upheavals, conflict, new technologies and modes of communication.   Landscapes are altered due to generational shifts and shifts in cultural contexts.  Archaeologically, sites contain the material patterns of both metaphorical (e.g. conflict, disease, technological innovation) and literal storms that changed lives and cultures, and have affected site preservation and visibility.  We invite  papers and panels from all five fields that reflect the diversity our discipline to contribute to a stimulating and engaging 2014 NEAA conference.

Click here to access the Final Program and Conference Events Information.

Click here to Register for the Conference.

Click here for helpful information for students.

We are excited to announce that this year’s keynote speaker will be Dr. John Omohundro, Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, SUNY Potsdam. Dr. Omohundro will be speaking on:

“Tradition and Uncertainty”

I started my career looking at immigrant Chinese (Fukienese) culture as a toolkit for surviving a hostile and uncertain but potentially rewarding environment in the host country, Philippines.  Soon, “disaster,” practically in my backyard, redirected my anthropological career.  Then I discovered the topics of risk and uncertainty in geography, economics, psychology, anthropology (particularly among scholars of agricultural communities).  The Sahelian famine, Katrina, global climate change… every decade delivered shocks revealing a bit more to me about how communities anticipate and cope. If we think of culture as made up of traditions, meaning shared, valued ideas about how to interpret events and perform action, then how well do those traditions cope with uncertainty? Do some cultures confront more uncertainty than others do? Are some cultures more successful at coping with uncertainty than others are? Do they get better with experience? And how good are anthropologists, compared say to engineers, doctors, geologists, or economists, at coping with uncertainty? I will ruminate on these ideas for a mercifully brief interval while you ruminate on your salad.

Please join us for Dr. Omohundro’s address at the Conference Banquet, Saturday April 12th.